THE POPPY, A SYMBOL OF MEMORIAL DAY

The wearing of poppies in honor of America’s war dead is traditionally done on Memorial Day. The origin of the red poppy as a modern-day symbol of this day was actually the idea of an American woman, Miss Moina Michael.
In war-torn battlefields, the red field poppy was one of the first plants to grow. Its seeds scattered in the wind and sat dormant in the ground, only germinating when the ground is disturbed—as it was by the very brutal fighting during World War 1.
The practice of wearing of poppies was further inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” written in 1915 by Canadian soldier John McCrae. He saw the poppies in burials around his artillery position in Belgium.
Today, poppies are both the symbol of loss of life as a symbol of recovery and new life, especially in support of those servicemen who were damaged physically or emotionally. Source: Columbia, Boone